Explanation of NetLogo model of Organizational Performance

Share Embed


Short Description

Download Explanation of NetLogo model of Organizational Performance ...

Description

 

NetLogo™1  Model  of  Organizational  Performance   Russell  S.  Gonnering   David  Logan   November  15,  2014    

Overview  

  This  agent-­‐based  model  was  constructed  to  understand  the  findings  on   Organizational  Performance  contained  in  “Tribal  Leadership:  Leveraging  Natural   Groups  to  Build  a  Thriving  Organization”.2    In  brief,  Logan  and  coworkers  conducted   a  decade-­‐long  study  to  investigate  the  root  of  performance  in  organizations.    They   found  that  the  primary  determinant  of  Organizational  Performance  was  a  quality   they  termed  “Organizational  Culture”.    While  this  term  has  been  described  in  many   ways  by  other  authors,  for  the  purpose  of  this  study  it  is  defined  as  a  coarsely-­‐ grained  quality  that  describes  the  pattern  and  capacity  of  an  organization  to  adapt,   based  upon  a  shared  common  understanding  of  purpose,  values,  history,  identity,   purpose  and  future.         This  quality  is  shared  among  a  group  of  individuals  termed  the  “tribe”.    It  consists  of   20-­‐150  members  that  constitute  the  primary  productive  unit  for  an  activity.    An   individual  can  me  a  member  of  many  tribes,  and  an  organization  can  consist  of    a   “tribe  of  many  tribes”.    This  number  may  have  significance  as  Robin  Dunbar  found  it   is  the  limit  of  an  effective  social  group  imposed  by  the  size  and  organization  of  the   primate  neocortex.3  It  is  a  number  consistent  with  the  military  organization  of  a   Roman  Legion  (Early,  maniple:  12  men  organized  in  groups  of  10  for  120;  Later,   centuriae  @80-­‐100  men  organized  into  cohors  of  480-­‐600).Logan  and  coworkers   further  found  that  there  were  5  Stages  of  Organizational  Culture  and  that  the  culture   was  communicated  primarily  as  tacit  knowledge  through  language.    The  language   was  both  “descriptive”,  as  it  quickly  identified  the  level  of  culture  of  the   organization,  as  well  as  “prescriptive”,  as  changing  the  language  was  the  method  of   changing  the  culture.    Each  stage  has  a  characteristic  tagline  that  embodies  the  level   of  interaction:    

                                                                                                                1  Wilensky,  U.  (1999).    NetLogo  [computer  software].  Evanston,  IL:  Center  for   Connected  Learning  and  Computer-­‐Based  Modeling,  Northwestern  University,   (1999),  http://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/   2  Logan,  D.,  King,  J,  Fischer-­‐Wright,  H.  (2011).  Tribal  Leadership:  Leveraging  Natural   Groups  to  Build  a  Thriving  Organization.  Harper  Business,  New  York  ,  ISBN-­‐13  978-­‐ 0061251320.   3  Dunbar,  R.  I.  M.  (1992).  Neocortex  Size  as  a  Constraint  on  Group  Size  in  Primates.     Journal  of  Human  Evolution,  ISSN  0047-­‐2484,    20,  469—493  (1992).      

Gonnering  &  Logan  

2  

    The  stages  are  fluid.    At  any  given  time  an  organization  may  fluctuate  through  stages   based  upon  internal  and  external  pressures.    The  change  is  linear.    An  organization   cannot  “skip”  a  stage  and  advance  from  Stage  2  to  Stage  4  without  going  through   Stage  3.    Although  the  change  is  linear,  the  performance  of  the  organization  is   nonlinear.    There  is  a  phase  transition  in  performance  as  the  organization  shifts.       The  advance  in  culture  is,  though  linear,  not  smooth.    There  is  “barrier  pressure”   that  must  be  overcome,  particularly  with  cultural  advance.    Many  organizations,   particularly  academic,  medical,  legal  and  other  professional  organizations  never   make  the  transition  from  Stage  3  to  Stage  4.    Tools  are  described  to  facilitate   transition.    “Triading”,  or  in  network  theory  closing  structural  holes  to  increase  the   clustering  coefficient  of  the  network  is  effective  in  the  transition  from  Stage  3  to   Stage  4.4  The  organization  converts  hub-­‐and-­‐spoke  examples  of  interaction  into   matrix  examples:  

                                                                                                                4  Gloor,  P.  A.  (2006).  Swarm  Creativity:  Competitive  Advantage  through   Collaborative  Innovation  Networks.    Oxford  University  Press,  Oxford  ISBN  0-­‐19-­‐ 530412-­‐8.     http://www.tlu.ee/~kpata/uusmeedia/Swarm%20Creativity_Competitive%20Adv antage%20through%20Collaborative%20Innovation%20Networks.pdf,  accessed   5/29/2013.      

Gonnering  &  Logan  

3  

Dyad%(Hub%and%Spoke)%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%Triad%(Matrix)% % % %

  An  alignment  of  values  and  purpose  is  the  tool  associated  with  the  advance  from   Stage  4  to  Stage  5.    

 

The  Model     Set-­‐up     This  model  is  built  upon  an  earlier  one  in  which  we  demonstrated  that   Organizational  Culture  functions  as  a  meme:  it  is  an  idea  that  affects  behavior  and   that  behavior  transmits  the  idea  to  other  members  of  the  organization.5         The  current  model  consists  of  agents  that  can  be  created  in  3  possible  organizational   roles:  executive,  manager  or  worker.    While  the  number  can  be  varied,  in  this   iteration  the  model  consists  of  2  executives,  4  managers  and  25  workers  for  a  total   of  31.    Each  agent  can  be  assigned  to  stages  2  through  5.    The  model  will   stochastically  assign  them  a  “culture”  value  within  that  range  (Stage  2:  20-­‐39;  Stage   3:  40-­‐59;  Stage  4:  60-­‐79;  Stage  5:  80-­‐94).    Depending  upon  where  they  fall  in  that   range,  they  will  also  be  assigned  to  be  Low,  Medium  or  High  within  that  stage.     In  addition  to  culture,  a  numerical  value  for  “values  dispersion”,  “information  depth”   “information  breadth”,  and  “perspective”  is  assigned.    For  “information  depth”  an   exact  number  is  assigned.    For  all  other  parameters,  the  values  are  stochastically   assigned  within  the  dispersion  limit,  as  for  culture.    This  is  because  agent   information  is  a  string  of  integers.    The  number  of  integers  is  determined  by  the   “information  depth”  button.    The  value  of  those  individual  integers  is  determined  by   a  stochastic  choice  from  the  “information  breadth”  button.    The  “intellectual  capital”   of  each  agent  is  determined  by  multiplying  the  count  of  the  integers  in  that  agent’s   string  multiplied  by  the  variance  in  the  spread  of  integers.    For  example,  the   intellectual  capital  of  an  agent  with  a  string  “1  1  1  1”  is  less  than  one  with  a  string  of   “1  2  3  4”,  even  both  have  the  same  depth  of  information.                                                                                                                     5  Gonnering,  R.  (2012)  Modeling  the  Spread  of  a  “Cultural  Meme”  Through  an   Organization.  Annual  Meeting,  Computational  Social  Science  Society  of  the  Americas,   Santa  Fe,  NM,  September  2012.   https://computationalsocialscience.org/conferences/csssa2012/csssa-­‐2012-­‐ papers/gonnering2012/      

Gonnering  &  Logan  

4  

Additional  items  in  the  set-­‐up  include  whether  or  not  to  set  up  triads  at  any  of  3   different  Organizational  Culture  thresholds,  what  those  thresholds  should  be  and   how  many  of  the  agents  will  participate  in  triading.    Overall  “tuners”  for  ”Economy”   and  “Other  tuner”  can  be  used  to  modify  the  results  at  each  time  step,  to  simulate  a   recession  or  boon  in  the  economy,  but  are  set  to  zero  for  this  iteration  of  the  model.     Additional  buttons  set  a  bias  factor  for  interaction  between  agents  separated  by  one   organizational  level  (RM1:    for  executive/manager  or  manager/worker;  RM2:  for   executive/worker).    It  was  originally  assumed  the  culture  of  the  more  senior  agent   would  carry  more  “weight”  in  cultural  interactions  and  RM1  is  set  at  0.15  and  RM2   at  0.30.    However,  even  with  this  bias,  such  weight  based  on  organizational  role  is   NOT  seen.       The  final  set-­‐up  buttons  include  an  “innovation  modifier”,  which  is  also  currently  set   to  0,  a  button  to  activate  the  pen  that  shows  the  trace  of  each  agent’s  movement,  a   button  to  set  Levy  step  length  for  agent  movement  (the  default  is  Brownian  with   stochastic  variation)  and  a  button  for  “inverse-­‐flocking-­‐probability.    This  last  one   needs  some  clarification.    We  wanted  to  have  some  way  to  control  the  agent’s   orientation  for  the  next  step  in  movement.    Originally  it  was  just  random,  but  a   suggestion  was  made  that  agents  may  tend  to  “flock”  towards  like-­‐minded  agents.     We  did  not  want  that  to  be  agents  of  similar  culture,  as  that  would  not  mimic  what   happened  in  the  real  world.    Instead  we  chose  “values”  for  the  flocking  parameter.     When  set  to  1.00,  the  agents  only  move  with  random  orientation.    When  set  to  0,   agents  only  move  towards  agents  within  a  1  unit  spread  of  “values”.    When  set  to   .50,  half  the  time  the  direction  is  random,  half  directed.     The  final  set-­‐up  possibility  is  “R-­‐Value”.    This  concerns  education/disenchantment   (described  below).    Currently  it  is  set  to  1  which  makes  it  have  no  effect.     Operation     After  the  “Set-­‐up”  button  is  pressed,  the  31  agents  with  their  assigned  values  are   randomly  placed  on  the  2  dimensional  plane  that  represents  time  and  space.    As  the   agents  move  and  they  come  into  contact  with  other  agents,  it  represents  a  union  in   either  time  or  space  and  an  exchange  in  multiple  parameters  takes  place.    First,   “culture”  is  exchanged  according  to  a  formula.    If  the  agents  are  of  the  same  cultural   stage,  the  following  takes  place:  

 

Gonnering  &  Logan  

5  

Cultural'change'based'on'Cultural'Level'in'a'Peer'Cultural'Stage'interaction.''L='Low,' M='Medium,'H='High' '

Cultural Level Difference Agent 1 – Agent 2 L-L L-M M-L M-M L-H H-L M-H H-M H-H

Change Agent 1 2 Neg 0 Neg 0 Pos 0 Pos 0 2 Pos

Change Agent 2 2 Neg Neg 0 0 0 Pos 0 Pos 2 Pos

  The  culture  is  either  added,  subtracted  or  left  the  same.    The  amount  added  or   subtracted  is  modified  based  upon  the  relative  role  differences  between  the  agents   (RM1  or  RM2).    The  magnitude  of  the  cultural  change  is  also  modified  from  this   baseline  if  there  is  a  difference  in  cultural  stages  between  the  agents.    For  example,   an  interaction  between  an  agent  with  middle  Stage  2  and  one  with  middle  Stage  4   will  not  produce  any  modification  in  either  of  the  agents,  regardless  of   organizational  role  (executive,  manager,  worker).    An  interaction  between  an  agent   with  high  Stage  3  and  low  Stage  2  will  only  result  in  addition  to  the  culture  of  the   low  Stage  2  agent,  modified  by  any  difference  in  organizational  role.    An  interaction   between  an  agent  of  low  Stage  5  and  low  Stage  2  will  result  in  a  loss  of  culture  for   both,  again,  modified  by  the  difference  in  organizational  role.     In  addition  to  exchanging  culture,  the  agents  exchange  one  of  the  integers  in  the   string  of  their  knowledge.         The  model  runs  for  200  time  clicks.    After  each  click  is  completed,  the  individual   agent’s  parameters  are  updated.    If  the  culture  of  an  agent  drops  below  20,  it  dies.    If   it  rises  above  80  (Stage  5)  and  the  overall  Organizational  Culture  (see  below)  is   above  60,  a  new  Stage  4  agent  is  “hatched”.    If  the  culture  of  an  agent  rises  above   100  and  the  overall  Organizational  Culture  is  above  80  (Stage  5)  a  new  Stage  5   Agent  is  “hatched”.    The  overall  number  of  agents  is  limited  to  63  until  the  total   Organizational  Culture  (see  below)  reaches  70,  when  it  is  reset  to  100.     After  each  time  tick,  the  following  global  variables  are  calculated:     Total  Organizational  Knowledge:    the  sum  of  the  knowledge  of  the  agents.  

 

 '

Gonnering  &  Logan  

6  

      Periodically,  based  upon  stochastic  calculation,  the  fund  of  each  agent’s  “education”   and  “disenchantment”  is  increased.    This  had  been  assigned  randomly  at  set-­‐up.     When  either  reaches  a  threshold,  culture  is  either  added  or  subtracted.  If  it  is  added,   an  additional  integer  is  added  to  the  string  of  knowledge,  selected  within  the  range   of  “breadth  of  knowledge”  chosen  at  setup.    If  culture  is  subtracted,  no  similar  loss  of   knowledge  is  assigned  as  it  was  felt  that  an  agent  would  not  “forget”.         Variance  of  Organizational  Knowledge:  total  variance  of  knowledge.    This  then   allows  calculation  of  Intellectual  Capital:  Total  Organizational  Knowledge  x  Variance   of  Knowledge.     Mean  of  Agent’s  Values  and  Variance  of  Organizational  Values  and  Variance  of  Agent’s   Purpose  and  Variance  of  Agent’s  Perspective.     Organizational  Culture:  mean  of  Agents’  culture.     Innovation:  (1.15Perspective  Variance).25     Intellectual  Capital  Constant:  a  coarsely-­‐grained  constant  that  unites  the  agents’   values,  purpose  and  innovation  :    (1  +  (count  agents  with  [culture  >  60]  /  count   agents))  +  (2  +  (count  agents  with  [culture  >  80]  /  count  agents))  *  (2.5  -­‐  (.3  *  Value-­‐ Variance1.3)  *  0.8)  *  (2.5  -­‐  (.3  *  Purpose-­‐Variance1.3)  *  0.8)  *  Innovation.     Organizational  Performance:    Organizational  Culture  *  Intellectual  Capital   Constant  0.1*((2-­‐Variance  of  Values)  +  (2-­‐Variance  of  Purpose))*Intellectual   Capital.75.    This  comprises  the  allometric  scaling  equation6  described  by  West  and   α

associates:    y  =  kx .    The  quantities  in  bold  correspond  to  the  species-­‐specific   constant  (k)  and  Intellectual  Capital  corresponds  to  the  mass  of  the  organism  (x)  in   the  general  formula.      As  with  biologic  organisms,  α  was  chosen  to  be  0.75,   indicating  sublinear  scaling  as  opposed  to  scaling  in  cities,  which  is  supralinear.     When  running  at  baseline  parameters  without  triading,  the  system  is  stable  over   1,200  time  clicks.    Within  the  200  time  click  parameters,  the  system  reaches  a  low   Stage  3  Organizational  Culture  with  a  gradual  linear  increase  in  performance  based   upon  the  continued  learning  of  the  agents:  

                                                                                                                6  West,  G.B.,  Brown,  J.H.,  Enquist,  B.J.  (1997).  A  General  Model  for  the  Origin  of   Allometric  Scaling  Laws  in  Biology.    Science,  ISSN  0036-­‐8075,  276,  (5309),  122-­‐126.      

Gonnering  &  Logan  

7  

  The  orange  line,  Organizational  Culture,  reaches  an  asymptotic  maximum  at  @  44.     The  number  of  agents  is  also  stable  at  24,  with  the  loss  of  7  workers.    The  culture  of   the  agents  varies  over  the  remaining  time  as  evidenced  by  the  red,  black  and  green   lines  in  the  large  plot.     The  system  will  only  transition  into  Stage  4  if  the  starting  point  is  manipulated  so  all   the  executives,  all  the  managers  and  4  workers  begin  at  a  Stage  4  culture,  and  then,   the  transition  only  takes  place  20%  of  the  time,  due  to  the  stochastic  nature  of  the   other  interactions.    However,  that  transition  has  a  profound  effect  on  performance:                     All 2 Executives + all 4 Managers = 0% !   2 Executives + 4 Managers + 4 Workers = 20%!   2 Executives + 4 Managers + 8 Workers = 55%     Organiza(onal5Produc(vity+ Organiza(onal5Produc(vity+ Final+Culture:+56.46+ Final+Culture+:+63.08+           "24        

Probability of Reaching Stage 4 Culture

35000" 30000" 25000" Organiza(onal+ 20000" Produc(vity+ 15000" 10000" 5000" 0"

Organiza1onal4 Produc1vity"

0"

20"

40"

60"

Organiza(onal+Culture+

 

80"

35000" 30000" 25000" Organiza(onal+ 20000" Produc(vity+ 15000" 10000" 5000" 0"

Organiza1onal4 Produc1vity"

0"

20"

40"

60"

Organiza(onal+Culture+

80"

Gonnering  &  Logan   If  triading  is  introduced,  the  situation  dramatically  changes.    A  ScreenCast  of  the   model  in  operation  can  be  seen  at:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uUmHj6B1Yc    

8  

                               

  First  of  all,  in  network  theory  the  nearest-­‐neighbor  network  is  converted  to  a  Small   World  network,  as  all  of  the  members  of  the  triad  share  in  the  cultural  changes  and   knowledge  acquisition  of  the  other  members  of  the  triad.    Whereas  the  network  is   original  constructed  on  a  nearest-­‐neighbor  segregation  by  values,  the  triads  are   chosen  by  matching  the  agents  with  other  agents  of  like  culture,  starting  with  the   most  advanced.         New  agents  continue  to  be  “hatched”  as  described  above.    This  occurs  when  the   Organizational  Culture  reaches  60  (Stage  4),  and  can  be  seen  to  occur  by  the  upward   jump  in  the  purple  line  tracing  the  total  agents  approximately  60%  of  the  way   through  the  200  time  click  run.    This  is  also  associated  with  the  jump  in  Stage  4   agents,  as  all  those  “hatched”  are  Stage  4,  as  evidenced  by  the  increase  in  the  green   line.     As  the  system  approaches  mid  Stage  4  (70),  other  things  happen:    To  simulate  a   “merger”  with  another  high-­‐performing  organization,  25  agents  with  low  Stage  5   Culture  (80)  are  added,  the  maximum  number  of  potential  agents  is  increased  from   63  to  100,  in  addition  to  sharing  knowledge  and  culture,  with  each  interaction  the   Values  and  Purpose  parameters  of  the  interacting  agents  are  brought  closer   together  (influencing  the  constant  in  the  Organizational  Performance  equation)  and   a  new  round  of  triading  is  started  with  5%  of  the  agents  forming  triads  at   Organizational  Culture  thresholds  of  71,  73  and  76.    

 

Gonnering  &  Logan  

9  

This  merger  causes  a  rapid  rise  in  Organizational  Culture  and  a  phase  transition  to  a   higher  level  of  Organizational  Performance  as  evidenced  by  the  slope  of  the  final   segment  of  the  green  line  in  the  Performance  plot  above.     It  must  be  emphasized  that  the  model  produces  a  probability  matrix,  not  a  roadmap.     Here  are  Organizational  Performance  tracings  of  20  runs  of  the  model  with  the  same   starting  parameters:    

 Small  differences  in  actual  starting  points  (the  setup  produces  a  small  stochastic   variation  in  actual  starting  point  as  the  setup  gives  a  range  rather  than  an  actual   value  for  many  of  the  parameters)  as  well  as  small  variations  during  the  running  of   the  program  contribute  to  the  complex  nonlinear  path  dependency  seen  in  the   midrange  of  values  in  the  diagram  above:    

Gonnering  &  Logan  

10  

                                The  end  result  of  the  model  is  to  produce  a  complex  landscape  of  Organizational   Performance:  

  Without  triading,  the  journey  extends  over  time  in  the  range  of  the  low  foothills  in   the  foreground.    There  is  a  gradual  climb  along  the  Performance  slope,  but  it  is   linear.    With  triading,  however,  at  @time  80-­‐100,  a  different  path  leads  up  the  slope   to  the  “mesa”  of  Stage  4  and  on  to  the  “spires”  of  Stage  5.    

 

 

Gonnering  &  Logan  

11  

If  one  inverts  this  response  curve,  this  is  the  result:     This  resembles  the  Epigenetic  Landscape  of  Waddington.7    Perhaps  it  is  more  aptly   called  an  “Epimemetic  Landscape”,  with  triading  being  just  one  “signal  transduction   pathway”  influencing  the  interplay  of  Organizational  Culture  and  Organizational   Performance.     Future     Fortunately,  as  George  Box  put  it,  “All  models  are  wrong…but  some  are  useful”.8    We   realize  that  there  is  much  unanswered  by  this  model,  but  we  believe  that  it  can  be  a   useful  tool  for  investigating  possible  “what  if”  scenarios  in  an  organization.    For   example,  what  may  be  the  outcome  of  new  leadership  or  disruptive  innovation?     How  can  dynamic  external  and  internal  pressures  be  expected  to  influence  the   trajectory  of  an  organization?    What  inflection  points  can  be  recognized,  and  how   can  they  be  used  to  best  advantage?    We  hope  to  further  refine  this  model  to  explore   these  questions.  

                                                                                                               

Waddington, C.H. (1957) The Strategy Of The Genes. George Allen & Unwin, London, pp. 11-58. 7

8  Box,  G.E.P.  (1976).    Science  and  Statistics  Journal  of  the  American  Statistical  

Association,  ISSN  0162-­‐1459,    71,  (356),  791-­‐799.      

View more...

Comments

Copyright © 2017 PDFLegend Inc.